All Careers Advice

  • Risk assessment and management is essential to modern business. From board level down, it is necessary to calculate what risks are able to harm an organisation and how best to mitigate or eradicate those harmful factors in order to maximise profitability and ensure the company remains competitive. Risk Managers / Directors are tasked with predicting change, forecasting cost to the organisation and predicting future trends.

  • Risk Analysts are the backbone of any Risk department covering any of the 4 main core areas, Credit Risk, Operational Risk, Market Risk and Regulatory Risk.

  • Credit analysts (or credit risk analysts) undertake risk assessment analysis of various types of lending proposals from the straightforward to the very complex, which can be for amounts in excess of £50 million.

  • Operational risk usually presents itself to banks, and other organisations, in the form of financial losses. These may be caused by deliberate fraud, or negligence – dealers exceeding their authority and establishing unauthorised positions, for example – or simply by error.

  • Derivatives are financial instruments, which protect banks, and other companies, from unexpected swings in the value of currencies, or commodities, by allowing traders to "hedge" their bets. There are derivatives of almost all types of tradable asset. The most common types for ordinary investors, however, are convertible bonds, currencies, futures and options – which are based on underlying physical commodities (base, or precious, metals, oil, etc.) – and shares.

  • SAS – with worldwide revenue of $2.15 billion in 2007 – is one of the largest software companies in the world, and a leader in the provision of analytical software solutions to business.

  • Auditors, in general, help the senior management within an organisation to implement, and maintain, financial controls that are in keeping with current legislation – to detect, and prevent, fraud, for example – but they may also be involved in other areas of company business, such as customer services, and health and safety.

  • Industries such as financial services basically operate on trust, but that trust is supplemented by government regulations, which aims to preserve the financial well-being of consumers, as well as investors, and the economy, as a whole. The compliance officer, or compliance department, within an organisation is charged with ensuring that the various regulatory processes, and procedures...

  • The Sarbanes Oxley Act, of 2002 – sometimes known as "SOX" – is legislation that was enacted in response to several high-profile, financial scandals, to protect the shareholders of companies, and the general public, from fraudulent practices.

  • According to Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Law, compliance is "an act or process of complying with a demand or recommendation; observance of official requirements". The principal responsibilities of a compliance manager are the development, implementation and administration of procedures required for an organisation to observe regulations governing its operation.

  • Financial analysts may work for financial institutions as diverse as banks, insurance companies or investment firms. A financial analyst, otherwise known as an equity analyst, investment analyst, research analyst or securities analyst, examines a range of factors influencing the performance of stocks, bonds and other financial instruments in an effort to identify what is and what is not, a good investment.

  • The European Union Solvency II Directive, often referred to simply as Solvency II, is a fundamental reform of the capital adequacy and risk management regime for European insurance companies. Its predecessor, Solvency I, was implemented in 2002, but did not radically alter requirements that had been in place since the 1970s and it soon became clear that a more comprehensive review was required.